DC Comics Legend, Carmine Infantino, Dead at 87

Batman and Robin were elevated to the status of American entertainment icons by the exciting 1960's artwork of DC great, Carmine Infantino. (Artwork: Infantino/Anderson)

Batman and Robin were elevated to the status of American entertainment icons by the exciting 1960’s artwork of DC great, Carmine Infantino. (Artwork: Infantino/Anderson)

Carmine Infantino, as rendered by another comics legend, Neal Adams. (Art: Neal Adams)

Carmine Infantino, as rendered by another comics art legend, Neal Adams. (Art: Neal Adams)

‘Silver Age’ comics legend, Carmine Infantino, died yesterday (April 4, 2013). He was 87. I LOVED Infantino’s artwork and the comic books in which it appeared. I never met the man personally, but if you ever mention his name to me, a thousand colorful, exciting images will immediately come flooding back to my mind. That’s the “power” of any really, REALLY great artist.

If you’ve never heard of Infantino, I highly recommend you take a few moments today to acquaint yourself with some of his amazing work. You may suddenly realize that indeed, you do recognize something he’s done, if not in the realm of comics, than perhaps in the arena of toys and action figures. Fortunately, there are numerous websites, personal interviews and in-depth articles available about the man, all free and online.

In addition to his extensive comic book art legacy, Mr. Infantino was also well-known by fans of 1:6 scale action figures as the artist who was chosen to illustrate the packaging of Playing Mantis’ “retro-repro” line of Captain Action action figures. In fact, the man who originally worked with him on that line, Round 2’s Joe Ahearn, has just posted a very nice tribute to Infantino over on the Captain Action fan website. You can read that post HERE.

Captain Action's first reappearance after 40 years was in this new box illustrated by Camine Infantino for Playing Mantis Toys. (Photo: Joe Ahearn)

Captain Action’s first reappearance after 40 years was in this new box illustrated by Camine Infantino for Playing Mantis Toys. (Photo: Joe Ahearn)

Bottom Line: If you grew up in the 1960s, you may remember begging your mother for “just one more” DC comic book at your local grocery store (remember those rotating racks FULL of bright, shiny new comics?). If so, your pleas would surely have been music to Mr. Infantino’s ears.

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2 thoughts on “DC Comics Legend, Carmine Infantino, Dead at 87

  1. kneonknight says:

    Mr. Infantino was probably the defining artist for DC back when we were kids, and I’d be willing to wager he inspired our own Wayne Faucher to pursue his career. It seems like all the greats from our childhood are passing on, and not many of the new crop are capable of carrying on their traditions. Along with Frank Frazetta, Mr. Infantino set a very high standard for illustration during the heyday of comics, and his work will live on.

    Rest in Peace, Mr. Infantino, and thank you for making our youth more enjoyable.

  2. Wayne Faucher says:

    I was once lucky enough to spend a weekend with Carmine and Julie Schwartz. What a time! We happened to be appearing at the same Con. Seems to me Al Williamson was there too. I remember all of us joking around in the hotel lobby in our nightclothes at 4 AM after some drunk fan had pulled the fire alarm and we all had to trudge down 6 flights of stairs together. Were were giddy with exhaustion and probably not acting like the pros were were supposed to be. Now, all 3 of them are gone. I’m a lucky guy to have spent time with titans.

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