Another One Bites the Dust: Longtime G.I. Joe Fan Favorite Website, “Oldjoes.com,” Calls It Quits

This screenshot of Old Joe’s homepage is one of the few images remaining online to remind fans of its once-plentiful and informative content. (Photo: dawhois.com)

For well over a decade, Oldjoes.com provided a wealth of helpful, full-color photographs of vintage GIjOEs, including this perfect example of the Tank Commander set.
(Photo: David Kish)

They say Bad News comes in 3s.
If that’s so, then this is #2…

Hot on the heels of our announcement of the impending closing of the Good Stuff to Go website (see our article dated October 1, 2012), a second, highly regarded website devoted to collecting vintage 1960s and ’70s GIjOE action figures has just vanished into the “ether of the internet.” It’s time to say goodbye —to Oldjoes.com.

For over a decade, Old Joes was a refreshing, easily navigated website that fans could count on to contain superb closeup photographs of some of the rarest and most popular vintage GIjOEs, vehicles and equipment.

Sadly now though, in just the time it takes to click a mouse—POOF! It’s all gone. And for some reason, the website’s enigmatic creator, David Kish, has decided to leave very little evidence of his highly regarded handiwork behind.

For reasons known only to himself, former GIjOE fan and collector David Kish has recently removed all traces of his popular Oldjoes.com website from the Internet. (Photo: David Kish)

For years, Google and other search engines have been unable to “spider” the popular site’s content due to Kish’s insertion of a string of “spider-blocking” code in the site’s HTML. As a result of his unusual decision, even the powerful Internet archival website, WayBackMachine, has failed to store a record of Oldjoe’s lengthy existence on the world-wide web. Unfortunately, future generations of Joeheads will never be able to peruse, study or enjoy its superb content. Indeed, a great loss for us all.

We asked Kish why he chose to remove the website and why he decided to “cover its tracks” so permanently. Unfortunately, as of today, he has not replied to our requests for an interview. If he ever does, we’ll update this article with his thoughts at that time.

As could be expected, fan reaction to the news of Old Joe’s demise has been predictably (and decidedly) glum. Fortunately, renowned GIjOE authority and expert, Joezeta, wrote in to The Joe Report and was able to offer us the following helpful insight…

“I know he (Kish) has sold off all of his collection. I guess the site was the last thing to go. It was nice to look at for sure.”

Definitely. Oh well… Bottom line: After a lengthy online search, the only remaining traces we could find of the Old Joe’s website were a few random photos that had been copied to other websites over the years (such as the Tank Commander set, above). It appears that OldJoes.com will now live on only in our memories. Adieu, Mon Ami!

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5 thoughts on “Another One Bites the Dust: Longtime G.I. Joe Fan Favorite Website, “Oldjoes.com,” Calls It Quits

  1. Rainmanred says:

    I frequented that site over the years in my 17 years of collecting Joes. Great for reference and just to look at and admire the collection. It will be missed a lot.

  2. GIJOEBILL says:

    It was one of my go to sites to see mint,clear pics and just well put together sites.
    I hope David still has a few Joes left. Sure wish he would make the site available in the future.

  3. David Kish says:

    Wow! I just found this blog post via a google search on my name. I had no idea it had been written! To make a long story short, I inadvertently lost the domain name oldjoes.com to a domain reseller and due to other priorities never attempted to get it back. When I saw this post, I decided to register the domain oldjoes.net and have loaded the site there. I had a great time collecting Joes and creating that site and I’m glad you all enjoyed it. Now you can enjoy it again at http://www.oldjoes.net.

    PS – the post mentions that I inserted of a string of “spider-blocking” code in the site’s HTML. If the site does contain this code, it’s certainly not something I did intentionally and if someone would care to help me remove it, I’d appreciate it.

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